Mar
01
2010

Wandering Traveler

LOS ANGELES

The view from our Silver Lake house/deck

Having spent a large part of my youth and post-high school years in OC, I was in LA all the time for concerts, films and food. Never could its endless sprawl enchant me as the great cities of the world do – it remains fiercely un-walkable, an endless network of overgrown suburbs and eye-sore strip malls lacking in Bohemian spirit. But it is the certainly the epicenter of Southern California culture and the best place for food down south.

Last week, the Renaissance Man and I had a lovely home to ourselves in Silver Lake for full days with brothers, family, friends… and plenty of eating (next time, I’ll share about LA cocktails). Some spots were less than I’d hoped (or heard), like mediocre-at-best breakfast at Eagle Rock’s Auntie Em’s Kitchen, or expensive, lackluster sandwiches at Say Cheese in Silver Lake, but there were plusses. Also in a later issue, the best meal at Jose Andres’ The Bazaar. It deserves its own piece.

Restaurants

Animal's grilled Sardines

•   Animal has received endless raves since opening in 2008. With a menu laden with animal parts, pig and bacon/chocolate, I’ve seen the like dozens of times in SF and long before 2008. So I found the hype unwarranted. But they do everything well in what is an unusual menu for LA. It leans heavily toward the fried side of things and I’ve had better versions of similar dishes in SF. That being said, I’d recommend it as a tasty LA meal that, similar to SF, is about the food, not the scene (the dining room is noisy but casual).

Quail Fry with grits

Crispy Hominy with lime ($5) lost my interest after a couple fried bites, and Grilled Sardines ($10) with duck fat gremolata, pine nuts and raisins, were prepared properly but not the best I’ve had (I’m a big sardine lover). More memorable was a rich Duck Confit ($14), its intense saltiness contrasted by the sweetness of dates and apple, plus pecan and arugula. The richness continued with a tender, medium-rare Flat Iron Steak ($25), drenched in truffle Parmesan fondue with sunchoke hash. Yes, once again, it’s fried, but I loved Quail Fry ($15), packed with crunch and maple jus, over creamy grits, chard and smoky slab bacon. I’ve had the bacon chocolate combo many a (happy) time – and here it remains happy in a Bacon Chocolate Crunch Bar ($7).

Jitlada's Khao Yam

•   Jitlada – I finally made it to LA’s legendary Thai spot, renowned for rarely found Southern Thai specialties and heat that transports me right back to my two life-changing months working at orphanages and in slums around Thailand. It’s in a dingy strip mall, but memorable for its immense menu of unusual Thai delicacies. For better or worse, I stuck to the more ‘authentic’ (read: unbearably hot) second menu in my ordering choices.

Spicy Sugar Brown Chicken ($11.95) comes in a rare Southern curry native to the chef’s hometown – nuanced spicing compared to more common Thai curries – and brutally hot. A spicy (big surprise) Tumeric Curry ($9.95) was tempered with coconut milk, pineapple, shrimp.

Spicy Basil Crab

Spicy (seeing a theme here?) Basil Crab ($15.95) is searingly hot, succulent soft shell crabs fried with basil leaves and dried coconut. Watch out for that yummy curry sauce. At first, it seems like it cuts the heat – then you find it’s more extreme. That was a favorite, along with lovely Khao Yam ($9.95), a salad with less chilis then the other dishes – but it still left a burn. It’s a melange of jasmine rice, mango slivers, green beans, kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass, carrots, cucumbers, sprouts, coconut, dried shrimp. Finish with a silky rendition of Mango Sticky Rice.

R23's Yellowtail Collar

•   R23 actually disappointed me. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with this solid Japanese spot for sashimi, rice and cooked fish dishes. But there’s nothing particularly noteworthy about it either. LA has too much good Japanese food to go out of your way.

Salmon Skin Salad ($9) had a fine crunch, Chirashi bowls (sashimi over rice, $11-14) worked decently, as did platters of sushi and grilled fish, except for a dry, overcooked salmon. Yellowtail Collar (market price) is  served by the collarbone… a hefty fish, its crispy skin too blackened in parts but striking in presentation. In a warehouse, art gallery space, I’d heard many recommendations for R23 over the years so expected more, but came away feeling it was just average.

Sushi Gen's lush sashimi

•   Even with reservations, Sushi Gen, in a Little Tokyo strip mall, is a long wait for a table among a mostly Japanese clientele. They serve straightforward sushi and sashimi, so don’t come looking for rolls or creativity. What you will find is traditional quality.

Though my favorite Japanese in LA thus far remains Asanebo, Sushi Gen is a great locale for straightforward sashimi – I went for the deluxe platter (around $35) and left pleased. They fry up satisfying tempura vegetables and shrimp, too.

Wurstkuche Belgians

•   Wurstkuche is one of LA’s newer hotspots. All under $7.75, order at the counter in the back (or front, depending on which side you enter from), grab beers at the bar and pick a table in a brick-walled warehouse. My anticipation was high from a menu laden with wild game and exotic sausages, among my top foods.

I have to say, SF’s own Rosamunde Sausages have been doing this WAY longer (over a decade) and much better, while newer places like Hot Doug’s in Chicago are exponentially more exciting  and delicious. Some Wurstkuche sausages were dry, others lacked the robustness expected in the combo (Alligator & Andouille, for example). Apricot Ginger Chicken Turkey sausage in a lamb casing worked best of the ones I tried.

Dogs & Belgian fries at Wurstkuche

Similar to Rosamunde, there’s a fine selection of Belgians and artisan beers (we had St. Bernardus Prior 8 and their # 12, as well as Chimay White, all on tap; $8 a glass)… but what I like here is the roomy, cavernous space, long picnic tables laden with mustard, awesome sweet peppers and the joyous bustle of families and friends chowing down on sausages. It made it taste better.  I was delighted to order hard-to-find flavors of Reed’s ginger beers, like Spiced Apple Brew or Cherry Ginger ($3.50). It’s an all-around good time, and affordable, to boot… even if they’re not top-notch dogs.

Bites

Duck tacos at Cacao

•   Cacao Mexicatessen – This Oaxacan gourmet deli is actually one of the highlights of my last visit. I’d go out of my way again for divine Carnitas de Pato ($3.49): duck confit tacos with avocado, onion, radish and the bite of vinegar and chile oil. Cheers to hand-made tortillas and fall-apart duck.

Choose from specialty cacaos, iced or hot, like Azteca Mocha ($3.50 or $3.75): coffee and Oaxacan chocolate with sugar, cinnamon, almonds, chile de arbol, chipotle. Street snacks and candies imported from Mexico are likewise a draw. My mouth puckered from the extreme heat and sour of 30 cent Saladitos Con Chile, salted plums with chile.

Silver Lake's Casbah Cafe

•   Casbah Cafe is a fine neighborhood go-to in Silver Lake, especially after the morning ritual of coffee at Chicago’s own Intelligentsia next door. I like the quiche and especially their scones (ginger in particular).

Best part is an eclectic, boho vibe and sidewalk seating. Across the street, is a longtime fave, Pazzo Gelato, which I’ve written about before.

•   Scoops – Besides the aforementioned Pazzo Gelato, this is my other tops in LA ice cream. With only a few alternating flavors, texture is memorable: almost soft serve-like, but still creamy, robust in taste. The crunch/cream contrast in Brown Bread or scotch goodness of Chocolate Whiskey stay with me.

 

Oaxacan gem, Cacao Mexicatessen

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May
01
2009

Wandering Traveler

Los Angeles: Italian or Japanese?

FAVORITES:

Angelini's menu

Angelini's menu

ANGELINI OSTERIA

The best Italian I’ve eaten in Los Angeles… even LA Times calls Chef Gino Angelini: “hands down, the best Italian chef in LA.” Angelini Osteria is cramped: you’re literally sardine-packed in, but affably flirty Italian waiters and gustatory pleasures make you (almost) forget. You have to shout above the din, but even with a group of friends, I was able to hear everyone raving over their dishes. This isn’t offal perfection like my Incanto at home, rather it’s a classic pasta and meat sort of Italian osteria with intriguing specials and plenty of Italian wines. Starters like the lightly Fried Anchovies ($12) over artichokes and beets, are the right balance of hearty and veggie fresh. Risottos ($18) are creamy rich, pastas are beautiful renditions of spaghetti or pumpkin tortelli, while daily specials like Sunday’s Saltimbocca alla Romana (Veal with Prosciutto,Sage and White Wine; $22) or entrees like Breaded Veal Chop alla Milanese ($30) with zucchini fritto and eggplant, are hearty and satisfying.

Snapper Sashimi at Asanebo

Snapper Sashimi at Asanebo

ASANEBO

My favorite Japanese in LA is this humble Studio City spot. There’s sushi but there’s much more, from Izakaya-style plates to sashimi. The all Japanese staff is sweetly welcoming and food comes out without much of a wait, but cost adds up fast, so be forewarned. Paired with lovely sake selection, my last visit included a hefty Seared King Scallop ($13) cooked in olive oil and lemon, topped with Hawaiian sea salt. Red Snapper Sashimi ($20) in Japanese Yuzu with sea salt and hint of tangerine infusion, reminded me of dishes I love at Sushi Ran in Sausalito. Yes, Miso-Black Cod has been sooo done, but theirs is a buttery beauty ($17), while Japanese Ono ($24) is served slightly chilled with ginger, garlic and fresh-grated onion. Even Fried Calamari stuffed with asparagus is a gourmet eat here. Being one of the few places I get actual fresh wasabi, I eat the stuff by itself, never wanting to go back to goopy, faux wasabi again.

HONORABLE MENTION:

"Tacos" at Mori

"Tacos" at Mori

MORI SUSHI

Mori is a brightly pristine Pico Boulevard gem with just as pristine service. My one complaint is the portions are not only an expected small, they’re often miniscule, so come prepared to either spend a lot (it looks reasonable at first glance, till you realize how hungry you still are) or as a starter meal. Still, what wins me over is that the usual sashimi/nigiri offerings are accented by delicately creative endeavors. Halibut Carpaccio ($10), topped with olive oil and yuzu juice, black pepper and pink peppercorn, was delicately fresh. Toro Tartare ($12), though long past it’s heyday, is mixed playfully here in the shape of an egg with minced toro, real wasabi, onion, pine nuts, drizzled with olive oil and soy sauce. Inappropriately-named Spicy Tuna Tacos ($8.50) are in dumpling skins, tasty, but basically two bites. There’s a somewhat reasonable $17 lunch special, but it doesn’t include any of these dishes.

"Trust Me"

"Trust Me"

SUSHI NOZAWA

With the infamous “Trust Me” motto, I find Sushi Nozawa overrated, without much to set it apart from the greats. But for straight-up sashimi (i.e. ultra-fresh piles of fish), this dingy strip mall spot has it down… and for a reasonable price. Just beware the unlisted sake prices: wanting a cheap bottle of serviceable sake, I fell back on Sho Chiku Bai Ginjo, which retails around $3.99, and I usually see at about $6 on restaurant menus. I should’ve asked. They charged $15! “Trust them” and go for the fish. But not for anything else.

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Mar
01
2009

Wandering Traveler

Los Angeles

california-los-angelesHaving lived in Orange County/LA area a good portion of my life (with family still there), I head down South regularly, exploring LA haunts as much as I can, struggling much more in OC to find high-caliber food and drink but always on the hunt.  My recent visit provided yet more experiences worth sharing…

DRINK

Seven Grand – The sad news is, this bar isn’t in my neighborhood.  The good news is, it’s the best one I’ve been to in LA yet?  There are a few mixology-caliber (at least from what I hear) spots I haven’t yet been able to visit (soon!?), but up till now, my foray into the LA mixology scene/cocktail renaissance has produced nothing compared to what I experience regularly in SF and NY (LA still often heavily factors in the vodka/fruity-sweet kind of cocktails popular in the ’80′s). Seven Grand, however, changes things. The space, for starters, couldn’t be cooler. In an old building in the heart of downtown LA (still desolate streets at night though they continue to try and bring more residents to the area), the grand staircase, lined with animal heads is almost creepy but wins you over as you pass a cheesy hunting diorama display midway into the musty, deer-head, pool table, old-fashioned wallpaper bar.  I like the corner wood booth tucked away to the left of the entrance or happily sit at the bar and let the bartenders shake up something special.  Their whiskey selection is thorough, if pricey.  When it comes to cocktails, the selection is minimal, sticking to straightforward classics, which I actually rarely have seen in LA up till this point, but have long been common in NY and SF (or New Orleans): Mint Juleps, Sazeracs, etc…  It’s good to see those done well in LA.  After chatting, the bartender mentioned an off-the-menu special, the oddly named “Big Mac“, made of Bourbon, Lemon, Blackberry and Cranberry with plump, juicy blackberries… an invigorating, balanced imbibement.  LA may get into the game yet.

LAMILL Coffee Boutique – Coffee is done oh-so-well in SF and when the king, Blue Bottle Coffee, secured a $20k siphon machine for their cafe, articles were written in the New York Times on down about this amazing test-tube display from Japan, the only one in the US, making coffee by an ancient, slow-brewing method. We’ve seen the craft accelerate here years back – I never have to drink a bad cup in my hometown.  I was intrigued by LAMILL’s menu, as it employs a number of the methods we’ve long seen in the Bay Area, like Chemex (hand-drip through a paper filter), Eva Solo, French Press and Siphon brews.  Each is brewed individually at your table, from a variety of beans around the world – both bean and brewing method, your choice.  There are special drinks on the menu, seasonal choices (like eggnog) or with pairings (like a gourmet jelly donut).  I already like Silver Lake, the neighborhood LAMILL is located in, but was even more impressed by the chic dining room and prompt service.  A slew of laptop writers seem odd in this setting and the food overpriced for what is trying to be both coffee/tea cafe and mid-range restaurant.  I love the concept but found each coffee I tried somehow disappointing, mediocre, lacking robust flavors of the best in SF and in Italy.  I decided to also try a specialty drink for a taste range, but found the coffee overly sweet and syrupy, reminding me more of Starbucks than of a quality coffee boutique.  But I only got to taste a few coffees, and at barely over a year old, I still want to give it another shot.  I sense it might be one of those LA, “style over substance” deals.  Maybe my expectations were too high, going as a coffee nerd all jazzed up at the sight of mini-siphons at each table.  The concept seemed fun, playful… but, of course, the coffee quality and taste has to match.  I really want to love you, LAMILL.  Maybe next time.

FOOD

Pazzo Gelato – A choice Silver Lake ice cream joint with some of the better gelato in LA.  They let you try flavors so don’t be shy.  I was won over by the addictive, smooth Banana Hazelnut.  They do a rich Egg Nog around the holidays and their European Yogurt is delectably tart, while Chocolate Tangerine gives a nice variation on the Choco Orange combo (one I adore).  Plus, it’s right off the 101 Freeway so easy to pull off and get a scoop.

Phillips Bar-B-Que, 1517 Centinela Avenue (near Beach Ave), Inglewood, 310-412-7135 – As is true of the best BBQ, this place is a dump where you walk up to a window and order your Que to go. I just eat it in the car, because where else are you gonna go in Inglewood (there’s also two other locations: Mid-City and Leimert Park)? Often named the best BBQ in LA, it’s probably the best I’ve had in LA, though not the best anywhere.  Friendly and down-to-the-earth, I find Phillips the real deal.  Smoked links?  Aw, yeah.  A good, spicy sauce compliments the meat with a slice of bread to sop up the extra sauce.

Brent’s Deli – So there’s a yuppiefied, chain-looking Westlake Village locale, or the real-deal original in Northridge.  Northridge is WAY out of the way for most of us, but I almost say it’s worth it to try this decades-old classic with pretty much the best corned beef on rye or pastrami on the West Coast.  Jewish/New York diner classics abound, sandwiches are huge, there are blintzes, chopped liver, and Jewish deli classics.  It’s a worthy detour heading out of LA on my drive back North.

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Nov
01
2008

Imbiber

LOS ANGELES

So my gorgeous sister just got married in So Cal and you know even despite the full week of family events and parties, I got in my fair taste of food and drink. Since I planned the bachelorette gathering, finding hip but chill locales was in order… here were the best from this trip:

COFFEE

Caffe Luxxe

Caffe Luxxe

Caffe Luxxe: My favorite LA taste this year (besides Pizzeria Mozza, which I wrote about in May) – and the very best coffee/espresso I’ve ever had in LA – is a Caffe Nico ($4.25) at Santa Monica’s Caffe Luxxe. How I shall say this? As I walked away, I felt the irresistible urge to turn right back around and order another. Worse still, I awoke every morning for a week thereafter, the memory of that perfected Italianate espresso still on my tongue, taunting me sadistically. With a menu of essentially no more than espressos in a pristine, little shop, Luxxe intrigued me from the get-go, but once I tasted crema-rich espresso mixed cleanly with candied orange peel and a splash of half-and-half, I knew I’d be forever spoiled. I have only two questions: why don’t LA friends I talked with know about this place, and, more importantly, when can I get back there?

COCKTAILS with a view (or a scene)

Chapter 8

Chapter 8

Chapter 8: My sister’s bachelorette gig was enhanced by a random lounge in the Northernmost part of LA County: sleepy, suburban Agoura Hills. While I have to say cocktails were average at best, Chapter 8 went above and beyond in the atmos department to give us an unforgettable setting. It’s “Vegas meets retro lounge meets glitzy bordello”. You can see by the photo that the amount of red means dress up, slink around, watch old movies on the flat screens behind the bar, or groove the night away in the dance room or outdoor patio. Take photos in the weird vinyl “tunnel” between the bar/restaurant and dance room. This place will transport.

Moonshadow's Malibu

Moonshadow's Malibu

Moonshadows’ Malibu: Cocktails here are average and at big city prices (around $12; the culinary cocktail renaissance has, sadly, yet to explode in LA), but Moonshadows’ Malibu beachside setting, again, more than makes up for it with the outdoor deck literally hanging over crashing waves on rocks below. What a place to take in the sunset or a warm night! Heat lamps, vinyl beds, cabana-like tables/booths and an outdoor tiki bar create a vibe that’s fun but chill (not obnoxiously wild, at least not when I was there – weekends are different, I hear). The blue lighting off of white vinyl cast a magic glow as the moon rises over the Pacific.

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Aug
01
2008

Wandering Traveler

LOS ANGELES

Farmer’s Market (since 1934) farmers

Monday-Friday, 9 am-9 pm
Saturday, 9 am-8 pm
Sunday, 10 am-7 pm
Some merchant hours vary

6333 West 3rd Street (and Fairfax)
Los Angeles, CA 90036
(323) 933-9211
www.farmersmarketla.com

The original Los Angeles Farmer’s Market started in 1934 with actual farmers selling produce from the back of their trucks in a dirt lot. Now it’s a permanent set-up with (horror of horrors) chain stores like Starbucks (?!) and Pinkberry surrounding its outer rim, and permanent open-air “stands” or shops in the middle.

San Francisco’s Ferry Plaza Building Farmer’s Market this ain’t. No rare, expensive, beautiful produce here. Nor will you find gourmet, foodie dream shops serving lavender salt or grass-fed beef jerky. You won’t even find much of what might be deemed “gourmet”. What you will find at its center is almost a time warp, reminding me of ‘80’s food fairs of my childhood with bright red, sugary popcorn or bags of roasted nuts sold by sweet Grandma-types.

I didn’t experience a taste revolution here, but I’m lulled into its charm nonetheless. Piecing together a meal from various “stands” is a fun experience, with tables strewn everywhere for ease. True to form, I researched and compared ‘best recommended’ from multiple reviews, then tried many myself. Here are my top choices:

DRINK

Eple

Eple

Eple: The one spot that was actually inventive and current is a brand new (less than a couple months old) fruit and juice shop next to Pinkberry. Calling itself a “House of Decadent Fruit”, they sell fresh, exotic fruits, and refreshing, eye-opening juices in combos I could drink often: healthy AND teasingly delighting the palate. I love the Strawberry/Red Pepper/ Banana juice – just enough, not too much, red pepper. They also have Kiwi/Spinach/Banana juice, and a few others.

The Refresher

The Refresher

The Refresher: I’m not a soda drinker (never touch it) but occasionally love a high-quality root beer. Still, I couldn’t resist the idea of trying from the large selection of rare bottled sodas at this stand, including their own excellent house-brewed root beer (Bennett’s Big Bear Root Bear) and a Lemon Cola. Check out the daily house specials.

LUNCH/DINNER

The Gumbo Pot

The Gumbo Pot

The Gumbo Pot: This somewhat greasy, Louisiana eatery was my favorite choice for a meal here. Not exquisite, most items are just hearty and plentiful, but shined compared to the letdown of Loteria or French Crepe Co. For $3, you get three hefty Beignets, drizzled in chocolate or plain (pair it with chicory coffee). They grill up Alligator Tail Filets, Catfish, Snapper and fried Oysters. Po’ Boys Sandwiches offer tasty meat (love the Cornmeal Fried Catfish), but darned if I didn’t have to dig to find the meat in all that French bread. And the Gumbo? Not bad. Nice, spicy andouille sausage and some good chunks of shrimp and chicken.

Loteria! Grill

Loteria! Grill

Loteria! Grill: After all the great things I’ve heard about this place, and knowing LA has some of the best Mexican food in the country (I’ve eaten plenty of it growing up), I was pretty disappointed. First, the price: $10 for two microscopic tacos – about three bites each – with rice & beans. Worse, each item I tried did not overwhelm me. It’s good, but heck, local SF taquerias beat it, hands down! What did jazz my taste buds, inauthentic as it is, was the side of “green rice” with flecks of fresh mint. Refreshing, bright and poppy – a treat. Also, tasty black beans. If only their mains were as great as their sides.

The French Crepe Co.

The French Crepe Co.

The French Crepe Co.: It’s mediocre, especially compared to Briton buckwheat crepes at SF’s Ti Couz, BUT… if you want to fill up on crepes, it’ll do the trick with a large menu and sweet servers.

BUTCHER

Huntington Meats

Huntington Meats

Huntington Meats: Just look at the photo of Jim and Dan on the website and you’ll feel good about this place. It’s old school in all the right ways, while current in its use of Harris Ranch, corn-fed meat. They make all sausages on the premises, which sound mouth-wateringly good (Chicken Jamaican Mango, Alligator Andouille). The Renaissance Man has been on a gourmet jerky hunt, trying all kinds of interesting jerky around the country (focusing on the Midwest where beef is king)… and he says Huntington’s beef jerky is the best he’s tasted. You can see the quality as it comes in big sheets of a large cut of meat, not in little strips like most. They make their own BBQ sauce, marinades and chutneys.

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May
01
2008

Wandering Traveler

LOS ANGELES

Pizzeria Mozza

mozzaIt almost doesn’t seem worth writing about a place that’s already such a hit… unless you love it enough to add your voice to the din. Though open little over half a year, reservations need to be made a month in advance and a line forms before it’s opening hour of noon. It’s not a hip “scene”, which is what normally draws LA crowds. In a very Bay Area move, this Hollywood pizzeria is all about the food. The room is high ceilinged and airy, service is attentive and professionally fine-tuned, but tables are packed tightly with the decibel level annoyingly high.

You’ll forget all that, however, when you taste the pizza that, despite countless delicious gourmet pizzas I’ve tasted over the years, actually stands out. I went in a little blasé, expecting a good pizza the likes of SF’s Pizzetta 211Pizzeria Delfina and Beretta. I was delightedly surprised to bite into Mozza’spuffy, blistered, hollow crust and find a doughy center. A perfect combination of textures. Toppings are fresh, traditional Italian with over 15 pizzas to choose from. The Fennel Sausage Pizza is drool inducing… the aroma of fennel rises from the plate tauntingly before first bite confirms it tastes even better than it smells.

mozza-1Appetizers are top quality, Italian antipasti with California freshness. The Brussel Sprouts in Prosciutto Bread Crumbs and Olive Oil are crisply invigorating, as are the salads, particularly the popular Chopped Salad. Whatever the gelato pie of the day is, order it… unless you don’t care for ice cream. I had a Meyer Lemon Gelato Pie: tart, refreshing, in a thick, homemade graham cracker crust, drizzled with white vinegar sauce. Their website shows a Pumpkin Gelato Pie – I’d come back for that!

Much has been made of this affordable pizzeria one can’t easily get into. Mario Batali’s first West Coast restaurant with Nancy Silverton’s heavenly pizzas and Joseph Bastianich’s wine expertise… is surprisingly worth the hype. On top of all this, Osteria Mozza, their upscale restaurant next door, is already winning national awards and acclaim. I’ll continue to recommend Pizzeria Mozza as a refreshingly affordable, stellar LA meal.

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